The Environment

ES/ENVS 1000 6.0 Earth in Our Hands: Introduction to ENVS Studies

This course is designed to provide students with an introductory perspective or framework of understanding for environmental studies at the broadest level. The course introduces students to environmental issues, using the urgent, emerging prospect of the fate of the "Earth in our hands" as the main organizing ethical, scientific and practical theme throughout the year.

Course credit exclusion: ES/ENVS 1000 6.0 (prior to 2009)

ES/ENVS 2100 6.0 Foundations in Environment and Culture

This foundational course enables students to develop a rigorous engagement with some of the complex dimensions of environmental culture, and to develop their abilities as engaged cultural actors in varied environmental milieu - as artists, critics, scholars and educators. In addition to learning how to read texts and situations critically and carefully, students will develop a cross-cultural, cross-disciplinary, environmentally-grounded array of creative skills.

Course Credit Exclusion: ES/ENVS 2100 3.0.

ES/ENVS 2400 6.0 Foundations of Environmental Management

Drawing on the natural and social sciences, this course examines the role of policy and management strategies in addressing environmental, nature resource and conservation challenges, in ways supportive of sustainable development. It provides an overview of the concepts, knowledge and skills that are needed to be effective in environmental policy and management in government, business and not-for-profit sectors.

Prerequisite: Second-year standing or by permission of the instructor.

Course credit exclusion: ES/ENVS 2400 3.0.

ES/ENVS 3120 3.0 Environmental History

Examines the culture-environment relationship in historical perspective. The focus is on ways in which social change is triggered by environmental change and vice-versa. Case studies illustrate general patterns of change, such as those associated with the introduction of alien species, new modes of agricultural production.

Prerequisite: ES/ENVS 2100 3.0, or ES/ENVS 2100 6.0, or permission of the instructor.

ES/ENVS 3130 3.0 Energy and the Environment in Canada

The course focuses on relation-ships between socio-economic development, energy use, and the environment in Canada. Energy sources, energy end use, energy technology, and energy institutions as well as the social and ecological impacts of energy use are examined. Energy systems supportive of sustainable development are explored.

Prerequisite: ES/ENVS 2400 6.0 or permission of instructor.

ES/ENVS 3410 3.0 Environmental Policy I

The formulation of environmental policy is the focus its underlying scope, concepts, legal bases, methodologies. Case studies illustrate the interaction of environmental policy with other policy areas: foreign and trade policy, economic and social policy. Critical review of how policy is created participants, effects, burdens and benefits.

Prerequisite: Third or fourth year standing, or permission of the instructor.

ES/ENVS 3420 3.0 Environmental Law

Introduction to basic legal concepts: sources of law, legal remedies, common law, administrative law. Planning acts, environmental protection acts and environmental assessment acts. Litigation processes, hearing boards, and their operation. Critical review of environmental legal concepts and their social, economic and environmental effects.

Prerequisite: ES/ENVS 2400 3.0, or ES/ENVS 2400 6.0, or permission of the instructor.

ES/ENVS 3430 3.0 Environmental Assessment

Provides a critical overview of the theory and practice of environmental assessment (EA). Course objectives include gaining familiarity with the fundamentals of EA; exploring substantive and process-oriented issues through case studies; and practicing methods and techniques. EA is examined broadly as a management and decision-support tool with applications at the project, planning and policy levels.

Prerequisite: Third or fourth year standing and completion of six credits in ES/ENVS/instructor permission.

ES/ENVS 3440 3.0 Resource Management

Current theories of resource management, methods, information and decision-making are reviewed critically. Ethical, cultural, social and economic perspectives on resource management are explored through case studies.

Prerequisite: Third or fourth year standing and completion of six credits in ES/ENVS, or permission of the instructor.

ES/ENVS 3510 3.0 Environmental Economics

The application of economic principles to environmental issues is introduced and critically reviewed. Linkages between economic factors, social processes and natural environments are explored. The use of economic principles in deriving solutions to issues of pollution control, resource depletion, and environmental regulation is explored.

Prerequisite: Third or fourth year standing and completion of six credits in ES/ENVS, or permission of the instructor.

AP/GEOG 3050 3.0 Nature, Power and Society

This course examines the geographic understanding of nature-society relationships. We review popular and scientific theories of environmental change, conflict and conservation, and examine the role that politics and power play in shaping ecological problems and issues.

Prerequisites: 54 credits completed including at least three credits in geography (GEOG) or permission of the instructor.

Course credit exclusions: None.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisites: 54 credits completed including at least three credits in geography (GEOG) or permission of the instructor. Course credit exclusions: AK/GEOG 3450 6.0 (prior to Summer 2003), AS/GEOG 3050 3.0 and AS/GEOG 3050 6.0 (prior to Fall/Winter 2005-2006).

ES/ENVS 4120 3.0 Natural History

Explores the beliefs, theories and practices of naturalists, through readings as well as visits to sites of natural history. It examines the ways in which current approaches to natural history are products of the historical development of the field, and reflect assumptions regarding scientific knowledge formation and practice.

Prerequisite: ES/ENVS 2100 3.0, or ES/ENVS 2100 6.0, or permission of the instructor.

ES/ENVS 4140 3.0 Environmental Thought

An introduction to diverse ways of seeing and understanding nature. An historical perspective on the development of environmental thought leads to an exploration of various perspectives and critiques of the standard scientific and technological approaches to understanding nature, as offered by alternative schools of thought such as humanists, deep ecologists and ecofeminists.

Prerequisite: ES/ENVS 2100 3.0, or ES/ENVS 2100 6.0, or permission of the instructor.

ES/ENVS 4410 3.0 Environmental Policy II

Presents a "theory" of policy development, covering the roles of various groups such as the public, NGOs, the media and industry and applies the "theory" to the processes of international Conventions and Protocols. These include the Canada/US Boundary Waters Treaty, and the Canada/USA Air Quality Accord. Covers some of the mechanisms that use environmental science to establish Convention on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

ES/ENVS 4430 3.0 Impact Assessment Processes & Practice

The current processes and practices of environmental and social impact assessment are critically reviewed through case studies. Emerging conceptual and methodological issues in the field are explored in the context of actual practice situations.

Prerequisite: ES/ENVS 3430 3.0, or permission of the instructor.

ES/ENVS 4442 3.0 Environmental Auditing

Concepts of environmental monitoring and auditing are presented through lectures, projects and field trips. Emphasis is placed on understanding the categories and objectives of environmental monitoring that routinely provide much of the scientific understanding needed to resolve environmental problems.

Prerequisite: Third or fourth year standing and completion of six credits in ES/ENVS, or permission of the instructor.

ES/ENVS 4510 3.0 Ecological Economics

Provides an introduction to the emerging field of ecological economics. Areas of focus include the appropriate scale of the economy in relation to the environment, the role of discount rates in mediating intergenerational and interspecies equity, environmental valuation, full-cost accounting, environmental risk assessment, and the application of thermodynamic and ecological principles in economic analysis.

This course builds on ES/ENVS 3510 3.0.

Prerequisite: Third or fourth year standing and completion of six credits in Environmental Studies or permission of the instructor.

AP/GEOG 4050 3.0 Nature, Neoliberalism & Political Ecology

This seminar explores complementary scholarship on 'first world' political ecology and the commodification of nature in order to critically explore issues of environmental management and resource conflict. It will draw on case studies about rural and urban North American environments.

Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed including AP/GEOG 3050 3.00 or permission of the course director.

Course credit exclusions: None.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed including AS/GEOG 3050 3.0 or permission of the course director.][Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4050 3.0.