The Global Economy

This stream introduces students to a variety of theoretical perspectives on political economy and the study of the institutions, structures, and political, economic and social relations that underlie both national and global political economies. Students will be introduced to the classical foundations of political economy (Smith, Ricardo, Mill and Marx) as well as contemporary theoretical frameworks or "schools" of political economy (liberal, institutionalist and radical).

This theoretical foundation will enable students to critically investigate the functioning of the international economy. Students will examine the origins, functions and development of the major international economic bodies, especially the so-called Bretton Woods institutions (the International Monetary Fund, World Bank and the General Agreement on Tariffs & Trade/ World Trade Organization), and how they integrate national economies into the international economy. Students will also study major regional economic institutions and agreements (e.g., the European Economic Community/European Union, the North American Free Trade Agreement, the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation forum).

In this stream, students will pay particular attention to recent trends in the international economy over the last few decades which have involved an increasing "globalization" of production, trade and finance. Students will analyze the nature of these changes, in particular the "neo-liberal" form that they have taken, and the economic, political, social and environmental impacts that they have had.

Students will also investigate resistance to the "neo-liberal" model of globalization and efforts to develop alternative forms of production and regulation. In this context, students will be encouraged to evaluate different economic policies, practices, institutions and models with regard to a range of criteria including efficiency, fairness and sustainability.

This stream will be particularly useful to students who wish to pursue careers in public policy and/or graduate studies in the areas of political science, international political economy, labour studies or international development studies.

ARROWS (→) INDICATES IT IS A MANDATORY REQUIREMENT

6.0 credits chosen from:

AP/POLS 2940 6.0 Introduction to International Politics

[Course credit exclusion: GL/ILST 2300 3.0.][PRIOR to Fall 2010: Course credit exclusion: AS/POLS 2210 6.0.]
This course explores the forces that structure power, conflict, compromise and cooperation both within states and among them, emphasizing the diversities and inequalities, the violence, and the on-going struggles to achieve political community that mark the present era of "globalization."

[OR]

AP/POLS 2950 6.0 States & Societies-Global Context: Comparative Politics

[Course credit exclusions: None.]
Introduction to Comparative Politics. An introduction to the comparative study of political systems, institutions, and processes. The second half of the course will examine in detail the government and politics of specific countries and regions.

→AP/SOSC 3042 3.0 Business & Social Exclusion in the Global South

[Pre-Req. Sosc 1340/Sosc 1349]
This course is for students in the Business and Society program. It investigates the intersection of business practices and systemic bias against marginalized groups - in particular visible minorities and women in the global economy.


3.0 credits chosen from:

AP/GEOG 3130 3.0 The Global Economy

[Course credit exclusions: None.] [PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3130 3.0.]
This course examines the evolution of the world economy as well as the major institutions that have supported it, and interprets the new geography of investment, production and consumption that accompanies it.

AP/POLS 3200 3.0 Global Conflict and Security I

[Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/POLS 3200 3.0.] This course acquaints students with issues surrounding conflict and security in global politics as it has evolved over the past three centuries. It examines the history and development of war from the medieval period to the era of total war, and the main currents of thought on issues of war and peace.

AP/POLS 3210 3.0 Global Conflict and Security II

[Prerequisite: AP/POLS 3200 3.0. Course credit exclusions: GL/ILST 3605 3.0, GL/POLS 3605 3.0 and GL/SOSC 3605 3.0.
Prior TO FALL 2009: Prerequisite: AS/POLS 3200 3.0. Course credit exclusions: AS/POLS 3210 3.0, GL/ILST 3605 3.0, GL/POLS 3605 3.0 and GL/SOSC 3605 3.0]

This course explores the issues surrounding different dimensions of conflict and security in the contemporary period. In its broadest sense, security can be understood not only in military, but also in political, economic, cultural and social terms. Several specific themes will be examined in this course, including: national liberation struggles and the rise of protracted social conflicts, the ethics of war, gender and conflict and the analytic attempts to define alternative conceptions of security.

AP/POLS 3240 3.0 Multilateralism I: The UN, Regional Organizations and International Law

[Course credit exclusions: GL/ILST 3615 6.0, GL/POLS 3615 6.0. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/POLS 3240 3.0, GL/ILST 3615 6.0 and GL/POLS 3615 6.0]
Multilateralism concerns the management of conflict and the building of cooperation among the variety of political entities and agents that enter the field of world politics and governance. This course provides students with a better understanding of the evolving role of international organization within the broader context of changing world politics and international law. Emphasis is placed on the historical development of international organization.

AP/POLS 3250 3.0 Multilateralism II: The Political Econ. of Int’l. Organizations

[Prerequisite: AP/POLS 3240 3.0. Course credit exclusions: GL/ILST 3615 6.0, GL/POLS 3615 6.0. PRIOR TO FALL 2009:
Prerequisite: AS/POLS 3240 3.0. Course credit exclusions: AS/POLS 3250 3.0, GL/ILST 3615 6.0 and GL/POLS 3615 6.0.]

Multilateralism concerns the management of conflict and the building of cooperation among the variety of political entities and agents that enter the field of world politics and governance. The course builds upon the introduction provided in AP/POLS 3240 3.0 (AS/POLS 3240 3.0 prior to Fall 2009), and examines actual structures, processes, activities and instruments of international organizations within and outside the UN Family.

AP/POLS 3255 6.0 Human Rights and Global Economy

[Cross-listed to: AP/HREQ 3010 6.0)
Course credit exclusion: AP/SOCI 3010 6.0 (prior to Summer 2013). PRIOR TO FALL 2009:
Course credit exclusion: AK/HREQ 3010 6.0 [3.0 credits will count towards the stream; balance 3.0 as electives.
]
Explores challenges to the fulfillment of internationally recognized human rights posed by globalization, emphasizing socio-economic rights like food security, water and livelihood rights. Examines the role of states, international institutions, corporations and civil society in protecting or threatening human rights.

AP/ANTH 3220 6.0 Greed, Globalization & the Gift: The Culture of Capitalism

[Course credit exclusions: None.] [PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions:AS/ANTH 3220 6.0.] [3.0 credits will count towards the stream; balance 3.0 as electives]
This course examines capitalist enterprise historically and ethnographically. It focuses upon forms of corporate capitalism; the historic spread of capitalism and the world system; globalization; and the failure of neo-liberal development to deliver economic prosperity.

AP/SOSC 3240 3.0 Labour and Globalization I: North American Perspectives

[Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 3240 3.0.]
This course looks at the post-war assumptions governing the limits and possibilities of trade union action in mature welfare states. It moves to looking at labour in English Canada and Quebec, the US and Mexico, pre and during NAFTA.

AP/SOSC 3241 3.0 Labour and Globalization II: Comparative Perspectives

[Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 3241 3.0.]
This course focuses on the changed environment for labour action and the search for new sources of trade union authority and power in the European Community, Russia, Australasia, Latin America and Africa.

AP/ECON 3150 3.0 International Trade

[Prerequisites: AP/ECON 1000 3.0 and AP/ECON 1010 3.0 or equivalents. Course credit exclusion: GL/ECON 4290 6.0. PRIOR TO
FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/ECON 3570 3.0, AS/ECON 3150 3.0, GL/ECON 4290 6.0]

Studies the microeconomic aspects of international trade, tracing its historical development from the theory of comparative costs to the theory of customs unions and tariffs. Topics include trade patterns, trade barriers and free trade versus protectionism, economic growth and development in the international economy, and international institutions.

AP/ECON 3199 3.0 Approaches to Global Economics (writing)

[Course credit exclusions: AP/ECON 3190 3.0, AP/POLS 3270 3.0, AP/POLS 3275 3.0. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/POLS 3700 6.0, AS/ECON 3190 3.0, AS/ECON 3199 3.0, AS/POLS 3270 3.0, AS/POLS 3275 3.0.]
Explores approaches to the global economy, emphasizing structural and policy-related aspects.

AP/ECON 3550 3.0 Economic Growth and Development

[Prerequisites: AP/ECON 1000 3.0 and AP/ECON 1010 3.0 or equivalents. Course credit exclusions: GL/ECON/ILST 3920 3.0,
AP/ECON 3559 3.0. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/ECON 3550 3.0, AS/ECON 3310 3.0.]

Studies the economic problems of poor countries and poor communities. Explores the meaning of development by considering the characteristics of economic underdevelopment, poverty, income and wealth distribution, rural versus urban development, population growth, and unemployment and migration. Additional topics include theories of development, growth and technological change, strategies for environmentally sustainable development, education, and health.

AP/ECON 3560 3.0 Economic Policy in Developing Countries

[(Crosslisted to: AP/PPAS 3560 3.0)
Prerequisites: AP/ECON 1000 3.0 and AP/ECON 1010 3.0 or equivalents. Course credit exclusions: AP/ECON 3569 3.0, AP/PPAS 3569 3.0. PRIOR TO FALL 2009 Course credit exclusions: AK/ECON 3560 3.0, AS/ECON 3320 3.0, AK/PPAS 3560 3.0.]

Examines policy issues arising from development planning. Topics include agriculture versus industry, international trade, monetary and fiscal policies, foreign investment, foreign aid and self-reliance, and global issues.

AP/ECON 3569 3.0 Economic Policy in Developing Countries

[(Crosslisted to: AP/PPAS 3569 3.0) (Crosslisted to: AP/PPAS 3569 3.0)
Prerequisites: AP/ECON 1000 3. 0 and AP/ECON 1010 3.0 or equivalents. Course credit exclusions: AP/ECON 3560 3.0, AP/PPAS 3560 3.0.]

Examines policy issues arising from development planning. Topics include agriculture versus industry, international trade, monetary and fiscal policies, foreign investment, foreign aid and self-reliance, and global issues.


For the Honours program: 6.0 credits chosen from:

→ AP/SOSC 4047 6.0 The Business of Neoliberal Globalization

[Course credit exclusions: None. Open to: BUSO majors in Global Economy Stream (and other BUSO students with permission).]
This course is designed for students taking the Global Economy stream in Business & Society. It introduces students to different theories of globalization and specifically to those theories based on free market ideology, politics and policies. It involves seminar-based and group-based learning as students evaluate the specific implications of neoliberalism to particular countries, industries and social groups.